Last week, United Response launched a DVD entitled ‘Promoting Person Centred Support and Positive Outcomes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities’, in collaboration with the Tizard Centre at the University of Kent.

Screened at London’s BFI Southbank and York’s National Railway Museum, the film illustrates how using person centred active support can promote social inclusion, growth in independence and choice and control for people with learning disabilities, including those with complex needs such as autism or challenging behaviour.
 
 
The DVD features a number of people supported by United Response in a variety of everyday situations and highlights the importance of social interaction, both when out in the local community and, crucially, between housemates who live together in supported living accommodation.

 
The film, which features Bev Ashman, practice development co-ordinator at United Response and Julie Beadle-Brown, reader in intellectual and developmental disabilities at the Tizard Centre, also notes that, often, giving people lots of short activities makes tasks feel more manageable. In many cases, the approach of ‘little and often’ can be hugely valuable.

 
Such an approach promotes a sense of independence, and, rather than focusing on one long activity in the day, this strategy makes the most of all of the opportunities available daily and uses these to get people involved in brief tasks, keeping people engaged throughout the day.
 

‘Promoting Person Centred Support and Positive Outcomes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities’ has been developed by the Tizard Centre and United Response, working with Frameworks for Change and funded by the NIHR School for Social Care.